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Children's Crossing Signs in the Philippines

Negros, Malapla, II.2003; pict. S. Snoeck Tadian, Mountain Prov., N.-Luzon,
27.II.2004; pict. S. Snoeck
Our first find probably is the work of a local craftsman. The panel is special in several aspects. (1) The circular shape: most signs in the Philippines are triangular. In general, round signs are rare except for India. (2) The presence of dashed double lines: if present, lines tend to be uninterupted (find other dashed lines in Gambia). (3) Both persons are of the same sex. Where in some countries this could be an illusion caused by the school-clothing (e.g. Argentina, the older French signs) that clearly isn't true now. Although the leftmost person wears trousers, the body has a female build. (Find a sign with two boys in Vietnam.) Few countries feature such a rich diversity in children's signs. Two main influences are at work each giving birth to its own group of designs :
(1) the European kind and
(2) the U.S.A. type of warning.

Albuquerque, Bohol,
28.XII.2003; pict. K. Mortier
Ayala Alabang, Muntinlupa City,
II.2003; pict. S. Snoeck
Alaminos, Laguna, Luzon
23.X.2003; pict. S. Snoeck
The European design is probably most common and certainly shows most variation in its drawing. The drawing is a bit static, the gender signals are clearly present and the signs therefore remind us of the most common design in countries like Belgium or Spain.
It happens that a European drawing is applied on a rectangular board; the reverse (an American design on a triangle) isn't found yet.
Notice how the second and third panel together bring a message. They tell us Trust our system. In time your grown-ups (the boy still wears short trousers though) will walk between the lines.

Batangas
IV.2003; pict. S. Snoeck
Batangas
IV.2003; pict. S. Snoeck
Batangas
IV.2003; pict. S. Snoeck

Roadsign adepts will notice that the pictures shown fall apart into two main groups :
(1) a design where the girl is the leader and
(2) a drawing where the boy is the boss.

It's the equivalent of a fight between Great Britain (the U.K.-group explained) and Continental Europe to gain influence.

Some of the European type roadsigns are peculiar because they show children with bald heads. Philippine pupils dress for school with the shortest possible hair-cut. The shape of the sign is not important, we've seen the feature on both triangular and rectangular panels. I wonder if our Monsieur Jean (coiffeur) will go as far as selling this in his salon.

Ayala Alabang, Muntinlupa City,
II.2003; pict. S. Snoeck
Suyo, Ilocos Sur, N.-Luzon
27.II.2004; pict. S. Snoeck
Rosario, Batangas, Luzon
04.XII.2003; pict. S. Snoeck

Rectangular boards with a European drawing do exist, but more often the U.S. type of design is applied. While we've found many variations in the European type, the artist has almost no freedom with the U.S. design of the warning sign. The general composition is measly. The Children crossing is illustrated with two individu­als closely resembling the people normally seen on pedestrian crossings. Although the Mc-Donald-panel states School zone, our man in the street, strangely enough, couldn't find any school nearby.
More important however is that several of the rectangular signs with U.S. design are sponsored. This could explain the rise of the American features (diamond, colours, adults). The local authority probably had to compromise!

Tagaytay
IV.2003; pict. S. Snoeck
Tagaytay
IV.2003; pict. S. Snoeck
Silay, Negros
03.I.2004; pict. K. Mortier

Our man in Manila drew my attention to an article in the Philippine STAR (published January 30th, 2003). After a study showed that Filipinos are ignorant of traffic rules a decision was taken to the construction of more over- and underpasses and to put up more pedestrian signs in Metro Manila. The pedestrian signs will be pink.
Asked "why pink, instead of the usual red?", the secretary of the Department of Public Works and Highways replied because it is more attractive to the eyes. Good news for collectors, that is.
30.VII.2012; pict. H. Parmentier Ayala Alabang, Muntinlupa City, II.2003; pict. S. Snoeck

Silay, Negros
07.I.2004; pict. K. Mortier
Silay, Negros
07.I.2004; pict. K. Mortier
Sta-Cruz, Laguna, Luzon
23.X.2003; pict. S. Snoeck
Direct import from Germany A sign from the Mediterranean group.

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More roadsigns from the Philippines: Men at work / Falling Rock Signs