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Children's crossing in Canada

Placentia, Newfoundland; 12.VII.2010; pict. Baeten & De Dier Victoria, British Columbia; IX.2000; pict. I. Campbell

Children (and a sign) to be proud of. Responsable boy, nice clothing, real children. Very nice drawing, reminiscent of the old French road sign, and ranking between the best. (See also Denmark, Croatia.)

Alas this kind is to be seen almost nowhere anymore because they are replaced by the modern designs which presumably are more distinctive. Regular readers of the site know it's the bleak fate of all those sweet old fashioned signs.

The yellow traffic sign warns for a crossing ahead. The blue twin sign indicates a school. Both are uninspired copies of the flat US signs. Could be the other way round of course.

Speed limits vary widely between countries (Madagaskar 20 km, 30 in The Gambia, 90 in Belgium): summary table in Australia. Canada is on the safe side but it's not always easy to know what's the maximum speed at a given time. Quebec, at noon on Ascension Day, what do you think?

Montréal; VIII.2001;
pict. D. Young
Labrador; 18.VII.2010;
pict. Baeten & De Dier
Montréal; VIII.2001;
pict. D. Young

The rectangular school crosswalk sign shows two adult persons. The drawing is worthless, but I'm glad that at least some variation escaped attention.

The head, as always, hovers above the body, but sometimes there is a neck providing a safe landing place should it need a rest.

The line at the bottom may be dashed or not. The latter is much safer. I wouldn't want to stumble in the middle of the road.

The modern sign for a school zone isn't worth much either. The former drawings show people slanting forward in a natural walking posture; it's gone in the new produce.

Both sexes are equally tall: both heads are on the same level. Equal rights preachers shouldn't cry victory, though, because male dominance is now back in another sneaky way. I, for my part, do not believe that the white pin-stripe along the leg is a production artifact and only that. Do You? Did you notice the pose in old and new signs? The new sign shows a stiff carriage fitting very well with the trousers. Power display it is.

Quebec; 18.VII.2010;
pict. Baeten & De Dier

Toronto, Ontario; VIII.2000;
pict. D. Young
Montreal; VIII.2001;
pict. D. Young
Toronto, Ontario; VIII.2000;
pict. D. Young
Toronto; VIII.2001;
pict. D. Young

The playground sign degrades in the same way.
We start with a lively scene with boy in knickers and end up with a strange creature playing hand-ball with the head of a smaller congener.
I wonder why no parent is ever alarmed by the absence of any trace of clothing. (A world-wide habit: most iconized people drop all clothing! Not so in Portugal, Malaysia.)


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More signs from Canada: Falling rocks - Men at work